Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/20058
Title: An Increase of Plasma Advanced Oxidation Protein Products Levels Is Associated with Cardiovascular Risk in Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Pilot Study.
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Issue Date: 2015
Citation: Oxid Med Cell Longev.2015;(2015):219569
Abstract: Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) are considered as markers and even mediators of the proinflammatory effect of oxidative stress in uremia. We hypothesized that an increase of oxidative stress associated with peritoneal dialysis (PD), estimated by the variation of plasma AOPPs over time, might be associated with cardiovascular (CV) risk and overall prognosis. In 48 PD patients, blood samples were collected on two occasions: the first one in the first six months after starting PD therapy and the second one, one year after. The plasma AOPPs level variation over the first year on PD was significantly associated with CV antecedents and also with CV prognosis. In those patients in whom the AOPPs levels increased more than 50% above the baseline value, a significant association with past and future CV disease was confirmed. These patients had 4.7 times greater risk of suffering later CV disease than those with a smaller increase, even after adjusting for previous CV history. Our data suggest that the increase of AOPPs plasma level over the first year on PD is conditioned by CV antecedents but also independently predicts CV prognosis. AOPPs plasma levels seem to represent the CV status of PD patients with sufficient sensitivity to identify those with a clearly sustained higher CV risk.
PMID: 26581178
URI: https://repositoriosaludmadrid.es/handle/20.500.12530/20058
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. La Paz > Artículos
Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. Ramón y Cajal > Artículos

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