Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/20551
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dc.contributor.authorBunsow, Eleonora
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Del Vecchio, Marcela
dc.contributor.authorSanchez, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorBurillo, Almudena
dc.contributor.authorBouza, Emilio
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-28T12:59:48Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-28T12:59:48Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09
dc.identifier.citationMedicine (Baltimore).2015 Sep;(94)39:e1454
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/20551-
dc.description.abstractEarly sepsis attention is a standard of care in many institutions and the role of different specialists is well recognized. However, the impact of a telephone call from a specialist in Clinical Microbiology upon blood cultures request has not been assessed to the best of our knowledge. We performed telephone calls followed by an interview with physicians and nurses in charge of adult patients (> 18 years old) whose blood cultures had just been received in the Microbiology Laboratory in a tertiary hospital. Patients were randomly classified in 2 different groups: group A (telephone call performed) and group B (no telephone call). At the end of the telephonic intervention, recommendations on the use of microbiology and biochemical tests as well as on the management and antibiotic therapy of sepsis were made if required. We included 300 patients. Of those fulfilling standard criteria of sepsis, 30.3% of the nurses and 50% of the physicians immediately recognized it. Advice to optimize the use of biochemical and microbiological tests was provided in 36% of the cases and to improve antimicrobial therapy in 57.6%. The median number of days of antibiotic use in groups A and B were, respectively, 6 days (IQR: 2-12) vs 9 days (IQR: 4-16) P = 0.008 and the median number of prescribed daily doses of antimicrobials (6 [IQR: 3-17] vs 10 [IQR: 5-22] P = 0.016) were lower in group A. We estimate a reduction, only in the use of antibiotic, of 1.8 million Euros per year. A telephone call with management advice, immediately after the arrival of blood cultures in the Microbiology Laboratory improves the recognition of sepsis and the use of diagnostic resources and reduces antimicrobial consumption and expenses.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsopenAccess-
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAnti-Infective Agents
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies
dc.subject.meshSepsis
dc.subject.meshTelephone
dc.subject.meshClinical Laboratory Services
dc.titleImproved Sepsis Alert With a Telephone Call From the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: A Clinical Trial.
dc.typeArtículo
dc.identifier.pubmedID26426609
dc.format.volume94
dc.format.pagee1454
dc.identifier.e-issn1536-5964
dc.identifier.journalMedicine
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/MD.0000000000001454
dc.format.number39
dc.identifier.pmcPMC4616830
dc.pubmedtypeJournal Article
dc.pubmedtypeRandomized Controlled Trial
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. General U. Gregorio Marañón > Artículos

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