Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/26493
Title: HIV infection results in metabolic alterations in the gut microbiota different from those induced by other diseases.
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Issue Date: 2016
Citation: Sci Rep.2016 05;(6):26192
Abstract: Imbalances in gut bacteria have been associated with multiple diseases. However, whether there are disease-specific changes in gut microbial metabolism remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (n = 33) changes, at quantifiable levels, the metabolism of gut bacteria. These changes are different than those observed in patients with the auto-immune disease systemic lupus erythaematosus (n = 18), and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (n = 6). Using healthy controls as a baseline (n = 16), we demonstrate that a trend in the nature and directionality of the metabolic changes exists according to the type of the disease. The impact on the gut microbial activity, and thus the metabolite composition and metabolic flux of gut microbes, is therefore disease-dependent. Our data further provide experimental evidence that HIV infection drastically changed the microbial community, and the species responsible for the metabolism of 4 amino acids, in contrast to patients with the other two diseases and healthy controls. The identification in this present work of specific metabolic deficits in HIV-infected patients may define nutritional supplements to improve the health of these patients.
PMID: 27189771
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/26493
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. La Paz > Artículos
Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. Clínico San Carlos > Artículos
Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. Ramón y Cajal > Artículos
Hospitales > H. U. La Paz > Artículos

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