Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/29489
Title: The Role of HIV-1 Drug-Resistant Minority Variants in Treatment Failure.
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Issue Date: 2017
Citation: J. Infect. Dis..2017 12;(216)suppl_9:S847-S850
Abstract: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance genotyping is recommended to help in the selection of antiretroviral therapy and to prevent virologic failure. There are several ultrasensitive assays able to detect HIV-1 drug-resistance minority variants (DRMVs) not detectable by standard population sequencing-based HIV genotyping assays. Presence of these DRMVs has been shown to be clinically relevant, but its impact does not appear to be uniform across drug classes. In this review, we summarize key evidence for the clinical impact of DRMVs across drug classes for both antiretroviral treatment-naive and antiretroviral treatment-experienced patients, and highlight areas where more supporting evidence is needed.
PMID: 29207001
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/29489
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. La Paz > Artículos
Hospitales > H. U. La Paz > Artículos

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