Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/29691
Title: Analytical Validation of a New Enzymatic and Automatable Method for d-Xylose Measurement in Human Urine Samples.
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Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Biomed Res Int.2017;(2017):8421418
Abstract: Hypolactasia, or intestinal lactase deficiency, affects more than half of the world population. Currently, xylose quantification in urine after gaxilose oral administration for the noninvasive diagnosis of hypolactasia is performed with the hand-operated nonautomatable phloroglucinol reaction. This work demonstrates that a new enzymatic xylose quantification method, based on the activity of xylose dehydrogenase from Caulobacter crescentus, represents an excellent alternative to the manual phloroglucinol reaction. The new method is automatable and facilitates the use of the gaxilose test for hypolactasia diagnosis in the clinical practice. The analytical validation of the new technique was performed in three different autoanalyzers, using buffer or urine samples spiked with different xylose concentrations. For the comparison between the phloroglucinol and the enzymatic assays, 224 urine samples of patients to whom the gaxilose test had been prescribed were assayed by both methods. A mean bias of -16.08 mg of xylose was observed when comparing the results obtained by both techniques. After adjusting the cut-off of the enzymatic method to 19.18 mg of xylose, the Kappa coefficient was found to be 0.9531, indicating an excellent level of agreement between both analytical procedures. This new assay represents the first automatable enzymatic technique validated for xylose quantification in urine.
PMID: 29147660
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/29691
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. Getafe > Artículos
Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. La Princesa > Artículos

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