Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/36173
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dc.contributor.authorGómez-León, Nieves
dc.contributor.authorPacheco-Barcia, Vilma
dc.contributor.authorBallesteros, Ana I
dc.contributor.authorFraga, Javier
dc.contributor.authorColomer, Ramon
dc.contributor.authorFriera, Alfonsa
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-28T18:07:19Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-28T18:07:19Z-
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationMelanoma Res..2018 12;(28)6:562-570
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/36173-
dc.description.abstractMalignant melanoma solitary metastases to bone or skeletal muscle occur in 0.8% of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate features of skeleton and muscle metastases with multimodality imaging and review the oncological outcome. Thirteen patients with melanoma metastases from January 2006 to February 2016 were included. Histologic confirmation was obtained. Imaging studies included computed tomography (CT), MRI, and/or positron emission tomography/CT. Treatment received and BRAF status were recorded. Differences in BRAF status and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the χ-test. Associations between OS and metastases were analyzed using Cox proportional models. Nine (69%) patients showed osseous involvement. Lower extremity bones were affected in three (23%) patients: first toe, right calcaneal spurs, and knee. The spine was involved in three (23%) patients. In two (15%) patients, the pelvic bones were involved. In one (8%) patient, the temporal bone was affected. Nine (70%) patients had a history of malignant melanoma, with a median time to progression of 28 months. The median OS was 18 months: 24 months in patients with a history of melanoma and 3 months in patients with metastases at first diagnosis. The median follow-up duration was 28 months. BRAF mutant versus wild-type tumors showed significant differences in OS (P=0.03). The hazard ratio for death in the metastatic group at diagnosis was 6.83, 95% confidence interval: 1.060-144.072 (P=0.04). Solitary metastases from melanoma to the skeleton and muscle are rare. CT, MRI, and positron emission tomography/CT are useful for the evaluation of musculoskeletal findings. Image findings are not definitive for diagnosing a malignant solitary lesion; thus, a pathologic confirmation with a biopsy is recommended.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsopenAccess-
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
dc.subject.meshBone Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMelanoma
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshMultimodal Imaging
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshSkin Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleSkeletal muscle and solitary bone metastases from malignant melanoma: multimodality imaging and oncological outcome.
dc.typeArtículo
dc.identifier.pubmedID29975212
dc.format.volume28
dc.format.page562-570
dc.identifier.e-issn1473-5636
dc.identifier.journalMelanoma research
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/CMR.0000000000000466
dc.format.number6
dc.identifier.pmcPMC6221392
dc.pubmedtypeJournal Article
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. La Princesa > Artículos

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