Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/41670
Title: Study of deaths by suicide of homosexual prisoners in Nazi Sachsenhausen concentration camp.
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Issue Date: 2017
Citation: PLoS ONE.2017;(12)4:e0176007
Abstract: Living conditions in Nazi concentration camps were harsh and inhumane, leading many prisoners to commit suicide. Sachsenhausen (Oranienburg, Germany) was a concentration camp that operated from 1936 to 1945. More than 200,000 people were detained there under Nazi rule. This study analyzes deaths classified as suicides by inmates in this camp, classified as homosexuals, both according to the surviving Nazi files. This collective was especially repressed by the Nazi authorities. Data was collected from the archives of Sachsenhausen Memorial and the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen. Original death certificates and autopsy reports were reviewed. Until the end of World War II, there are 14 death certificates which state "suicide" as cause of death of prisoners classified as homosexuals, all of them men aged between 23 and 59 years and of various religions and social strata. Based on a population of 1,200 prisoners classified as homosexuals, this allows us to calculate a suicide rate of 1,167/100,000 (over the period of eight years) for this population, a rate 10 times higher than for global inmates (111/100,000). However, our study has several limitations: not all suicides are registered; some murders were covered-up as suicides; most documents were lost during the war or destroyed by the Nazis when leaving the camps and not much data is available from other camps to compare. We conclude that committing suicides in Sachsenhausen was a common practice, although accurate data may be impossible to obtain.
PMID: 28426734
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/41670
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. 12 de Octubre > Artículos

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