Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/55207
Title: A worldwide perspective of sepsis epidemiology and survival according to age: Observational data from the ICON audit.
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Issue Date: 13-Feb-2019
Citation: J Crit Care.2019 06;(51):122-132
Abstract: To investigate age-related differences in outcomes of critically ill patients with sepsis around the world. We performed a secondary analysis of data from the prospective ICON audit, in which all adult (>16 years) patients admitted to participating ICUs between May 8 and 18, 2012, were included, except admissions for routine postoperative observation. For this sub-analysis, the 10,012 patients with completed age data were included. They were divided into five age groups - ≤50, 51-60, 61-70, 71-80, >80 years. Sepsis was defined as infection plus at least one organ failure. A total of 2963 patients had sepsis, with similar proportions across the age groups (≤50 = 25.2%; 51-60 = 30.3%; 61-70 = 32.8%; 71-80 = 30.7%; >80 = 30.9%). Hospital mortality increased with age and in patients >80 years was almost twice that of patients ≤50 years (49.3% vs 25.2%, p 80 = 30.9%). Hospital mortality increased with age and in patients >80 years was almost twice that of patients ≤50 years (49.3% vs 25.2%, p 80 years was almost twice that of patients ≤50 years (49.3% vs 25.2%, p  70 years was independently associated with increased risk of dying. The odds for death in ICU patients with sepsis increased with age with the maximal rate of increase occurring between the ages of 71 and 77 years.
PMID: 30802758
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/55207
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > FIIB H. U. Infanta Sofía y H. U. Henares > Artículos

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