Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/56555
Title: Thirty-day suicidal thoughts and behaviors among hospital workers during the first wave of the Spain COVID-19 outbreak.
Authors: 
Keywords: 
Mesh: 
Issue Date: 4-Jan-2021
Citation: Depress Anxiety.2021;(38)5:528-544
Abstract: Healthcare workers are a key occupational group at risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STB). We investigated the prevalence and correlates of STB among hospital workers during the first wave of the Spain COVID-19 outbreak (March-July 2020). Data come from the baseline assessment of a cohort of Spanish hospital workers (n = 5450), recruited from 10 hospitals just after the height of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak (May 5-July 23, 2020). Web-based self-report surveys assessed 30-day STB, individual characteristics, and potentially modifiable contextual factors related to hospital workers' work and financial situation. Thirty-day STB prevalence was estimated at 8.4% (4.9% passive ideation only, 3.5% active ideation with or without a plan or attempt). A total of n = 6 professionals attempted suicide in the past 30 days. In adjusted models, 30-day STB remained significantly associated with pre-pandemic lifetime mood (odds ratio [OR] = 2.92) and anxiety disorder (OR = 1.90). Significant modifiable factors included a perceived lack of coordination, communication, personnel, or supervision at work (population-attributable risk proportion [PARP] = 50.5%), and financial stress (PARP = 44.1%). Thirty-day STB among hospital workers during the first wave of the Spain COVID-19 outbreak was high. Hospital preparedness for virus outbreaks should be increased, and strong governmental policy response is needed to increase financial security among hospital workers.
PMID: 33393724
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/56555
Rights: openAccess
Appears in Collections:Centros de Atención Primaria > Artículos

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
PMC8246904.pdf992.71 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons