Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/56741
Title: Predictors of Loss to Follow-Up Among Pediatric and Adult Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Survivors: A Report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.
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Issue Date: 11-Nov-2019
Citation: Biol Blood Marrow Transplant.2020;(26)3:553-561
Abstract: Follow-up is integral for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) care to ensure surveillance and intervention for complications. We characterized the incidence of and predictors for being lost to follow-up. Two-year survivors of first allogeneic HCT (10,367 adults and 3865 children) or autologous HCT (7291 adults and 467 children) for malignant/nonmalignant disorders between 2002 and 2013 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research were selected. The cumulative incidence of being lost to follow-up (defined as having missed 2 consecutive follow-up reporting periods) was calculated. Marginal Cox models (adjusted for center effect) were fit to evaluate predictors. The 10-year cumulative incidence of being lost to follow-up was 13% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12% to 14%) in adult allogeneic HCT survivors, 15% (95% CI, 14% to 16%) in adult autologous HCT survivors, 25% (95% CI, 24% to 27%) in pediatric allogeneic HCT survivors, and 24% (95% CI, 20% to 29%) in pediatric autologous HCT survivors. Factors associated with being lost to follow-up include younger age, nonmalignant disease, public/no insurance (reference: private), residence farther from the tranplantation center, and being unmarried in adult allogeneic HCT survivors; older age and testicular/germ cell tumor (reference: non-Hodgkin lymphoma) in adult autologous HCT survivors; older age, public/no insurance (reference: private), and nonmalignant disease in pediatric allogeneic HCT survivors; and older age in pediatric autologous HCT survivors. Follow-up focusing on minimizing attrition in high-risk groups is needed to ensure surveillance for late effects.
PMID: 31726205
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/56741
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > FIB H. Infantil U. Niño Jesús > Artículos

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