Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/57241
Title: Consensus clinical scoring for suspected perioperative immediate hypersensitivity reactions.
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Issue Date: 24-Apr-2019
Citation: Br J Anaesth.2019;(123)1:e29-e37
Abstract: Grading schemes for severity of suspected allergic reactions have been applied to the perioperative setting, but there is no scoring system that estimates the likelihood that the reaction is an immediate hypersensitivity reaction. Such a score would be useful in evaluating current and proposed tests for the diagnosis of suspected perioperative immediate hypersensitivity reactions and culprit agents. We conducted a Delphi consensus process involving a panel of 25 international multidisciplinary experts in suspected perioperative allergy. Items were ranked according to appropriateness (on a scale of 1-9) and consensus, which informed development of a clinical scoring system. The scoring system was assessed by comparing scores generated for a series of clinical scenarios against ratings of panel members. Supplementary scores for mast cell tryptase were generated. Two rounds of the Delphi process achieved stopping criteria for all statements. From an initial 60 statements, 43 were rated appropriate (median score 7 or more) and met agreement criteria (disagreement index We used a robust consensus development process to devise a clinical scoring system for suspected perioperative immediate hypersensitivity reactions. This will enable objectivity and uniformity in the assessment of the sensitivity of diagnostic tests.
PMID: 31029409
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/57241
Appears in Collections:Hospitales > H. Central de la Cruz Roja San José y Santa Adela > Artículos

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