Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/57507
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dc.contributor.authorHernández-Píriz, Alba
dc.contributor.authorTung-Chen, Yale
dc.contributor.authorJiménez-Virumbrales, David
dc.contributor.authorAyala-Larrañaga, Ibone
dc.contributor.authorBarba-Martín, Raquel
dc.contributor.authorCanora-Lebrato, Jesús
dc.contributor.authorZapatero-Gaviria, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorCasasola-Sánchez, Gonzalo García De
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-09T14:22:04Z-
dc.date.available2023-01-09T14:22:04Z-
dc.date.issued2021-07-20
dc.identifier.citationJ Clin Med.2021;(10)14:
dc.identifier.issn2077-0383
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/57507-
dc.description.abstractThere is growing evidence regarding the imaging findings of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in lung ultrasounds, however, their role in predicting the prognosis has yet to be explored. Our objective was to assess the usefulness of lung ultrasound in the short-term follow-up (1 and 3 months) of patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia, and to describe the progression of the most relevant lung ultrasound findings. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal and observational study performed in patients with confirmed COVID-19 who underwent a lung ultrasound examination during hospitalization and repeated it 1 and 3 months after hospital discharge. A total of 96 patients were enrolled. In the initial ultrasound, bilateral involvement was present in 100% of the patients with mild, moderate or severe ARDS. The most affected lung area was the posteroinferior (93.8%) followed by the lateral (88.7%). Subpleural consolidations were present in 68% of the patients and consolidations larger than 1 cm in 24%. One month after the initial study, only 20.8% had complete resolution on lung ultrasound. This percentage rose to 68.7% at 3 months. Residual lesions were observed in a significant percentage of patients who recovered from moderate or severe ARDS (32.4% and 61.5%, respectively). In conclusion, lung injury associated with COVID-19 might take time to resolve. The findings in this report support the use of lung ultrasound in the short-term follow-up of patients recovered from COVID-19, as a radiation-sparing, easy to use, novel care path worth exploring.
dc.language.isoen
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/
dc.subjectcoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
dc.subjectlung score
dc.subjectlung ultrasound (LUS)
dc.subjectsevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)
dc.titleImportance of Lung Ultrasound Follow-Up in Patients Who Had Recovered from Coronavirus Disease 2019: Results from a Prospective Study.
dc.typeArtículo
dc.identifier.pubmedID34300362
dc.format.volume10
dc.identifier.journalJournal of clinical medicine
dc.identifier.journalabbreviationJ Clin Med
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jcm10143196
dc.format.number14
dc.identifier.pmcPMC8307687
dc.pubmedtypeJournal Article
dc.identifier.pubmedURLhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8307687/pdf
Appears in Collections:Hospitales > H. U. Infanta Cristina > Artículos
Hospitales > H. U. Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda > Artículos
Hospitales > H. U. Severo Ochoa > Artículos
Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. U. Puerta de Hierro-Segovia de Arana > Artículos

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