Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/73654
Title: A longitudinal study of adolescents engaged in Non-Suicidal Self Injury (NSSI): clinical follow-up from adolescence to young adulthood.
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Issue Date: 9-Jan-2021
Citation: Psychiatry Res.2021;(297):113711
Abstract: The main aim of the current study is to examine the demographic and clinical factors that predict a continuity of the use of Mental Health Services (MHS) in adulthood by subjects who have engaged in non-suicidal-self-injury behaviors (NSSI) and have been followed in MHS in their teen years. A cohort of 147 participants was selected from an original sample of 267 adolescent patients recruited from the Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services. Patients were divided into two groups: those who had engaged in NSSI (NSSI-group), and those who had not (non-NSSI-group). Rate of use of MHS in adulthood was calculated for both groups and univariate analyses and binary logistic regression analysis were applied. In the NSSI-group, two factors appeared to influence a continuity of the use of MHS in adulthood. Prosocial behavior was associated with a greater use of MHS in adulthood whereas behavioral problems were associated with less use. Only prosocial behavior was maintained in the regression model as a predictor. Our findings could have implications for clinical practice with NSSI patients and highlight the importance of working on specific areas that could prevent treatment abandonment in the transition from adolescence to adulthood.
PMID: 33486275
URI: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12530/73654
Appears in Collections:Fundaciones e Institutos de Investigación > IIS H. General U. Gregorio Marañón > Artículos
Hospitales > H. U. Severo Ochoa > Artículos

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